Kissing Cousins, Twice Removed


I never understood the family tree relationships. When my grandmother’s sister’s kids started having grandkids I didn’t know what to call them. I knew we were some kind of cousin, but I’d heard the terms: second cousins- once removed, first cousin, first cousin-once removed. Removed from where? It’s always been confusing.  There’s also the first cousins kids having kids; Who are they to me? I know they are removed from something. To make it completely mind-boggling, my mother’s father was marrying anyone and everyone and bringing forth children all over the place who were reproducing to take over the earth. They were ½ cousins, ½ second cousins and whatever.

CAN I GET A SMILE OUT OF JUNE? NO, NOT YOU, SECOND COUSIN TWICE REMOVED JUNE!

family reunion

Last week, a woman I always referred to as “Aunt” died. She was a fun loving gal and always someone I looked up to when I was a little kid. However, she wasn’t my aunt. She was my father’s aunt’s kid. Her kids were a little younger than me and what were they to me?  Some kind of cousin removed from something.

After sending flowers and condolences off to the east coast, I started researching the “rules” of the relatives game.                                                                                                                                     In case there’s one other dummy like me I can reach, this is for you pal.

Children of siblings are first cousins as they share grandparents. Children of first cousins are second cousins as they share great grandparents. Children of second cousins are third cousins as they share great great grandparents; and so on.

The “removes” come in when you are in a different generation coming down from a common ancestor. Your first cousins’ children are your first cousins once removed because your grandparents are their great grandparents. The same is true of your relationship to your parents’ first cousins. Their grandparents are your great grandparents so you are also a first cousin once removed to them.

HERE ARE THE RULES OF THE RELATIVES

Genealogy Relationship Chart

 

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

10

1

Common Ancestor

Son or Daughter

Grandson or Daughter

Great Grandson or Daughter

2nd Great Grandson or Daughter

3rd Great Grandson or Daughter

4th Great Grandson or Daughter

5th Great Grandson or Daughter

6th Great Grandson or Daughter

7th Great Grandson or Daughter

2

Son or Daughter

Brother or Sister

Niece or Nephew Grand Niece or Nephew Great Grand  Niece or Nephew 2nd Great Grand Niece or Nephew 3rd Great Grand Niece or Nephew 4th Great Grand Niece or Nephew 5th Great Grand Niece or Nephew 6th Great Grand Niece or Nephew

3

Grandson or Daughter

Niece or Nephew

First Cousin

First Cousin Once Removed

First Cousin Twice Removed

First Cousin Three Times Removed

First Cousin Four Times Removed

First Cousin Five Times Removed

First Cousin Six Times Removed

First Cousin Seven Times Removed

4

Great Grandson or Daughter

Grand Niece or Nephew

First Cousin Once Removed

Second Cousin

Second Cousin Once Removed

Second Cousin Twice Removed

Second Cousin Three Times Removed

Second Cousin Four Times Removed

Second Cousin Five Times Removed

Second Cousin Six Times Removed

5

2nd Great Grandson or Daughter

Great Grand Niece or Nephew

First Cousin Twice Removed

Second Cousin Once Removed

Third Cousin

Third Cousin Once Removed

Third Cousin Twice Removed

Third Cousin Three Times Removed

Third Cousin Four Times Removed

Second Cousin Five Times Removed

6

3rd Great Grandson or Daughter

2nd Great Grand Niece or Nephew

First Cousin Three Times Removed

Second Cousin Twice Removed

Third Cousin Once Removed

Fourth Cousin

Fourth Cousin Once Removed

Fourth Cousin Twice Removed

Fourth Cousin Three Times Removed

Fourth Cousin Four Times Removed

7

4th Great Grandson or Daughter

3rd Great Grand Niece or Nephew

First Cousin Four Times Removed

Second Cousin Three Times Removed

Third Cousin Twice Removed

Fourth Cousin Once Removed

Fifth Cousin

Fifth Cousin Once Removed

Fifth Cousin Twice Removed

Fifth Cousin Three Times Removed

8

5th Great Grandson or Daughter

4th Great Grand Niece or Nephew

First Cousin Five Times Removed

Second Cousin Four Times Removed

Third Cousin Three Times Removed

Fourth Cousin Twice Removed

Fifth Cousin Once Removed

Sixth Cousin

Sixth Cousin Once Removed

Sixth Cousin Twice Removed

9

6th Great Grandson or Daughter

5th Great Grand Niece or Nephew

First Cousin Six Times Removed

Second Cousin Five Times Removed

Third Cousin Four Times Removed

Fourth Cousin Three Times Removed

Fifth Cousin Twice Removed

Sixth Cousin Once Removed

Seventh Cousin

Seventh Cousin Once Removed

10

7th Great Grandson or Daughter

6th Great Grand Niece or Nephew

First Cousin Seven Times Removed

Second Cousin Six Times Removed

Third Cousin Five Times Removed

Fourth Cousin Four Times Removed

Fifth Cousin Three Times Removed

Sixth Cousin Twice Removed

Seventh Cousin Once Removed

Eighth Cousin

Instructions:

  1. Select two people in your family and figure out which ancestor they have in common. For example, if you chose yourself and a first cousin, you would have a grandparent in common.
  2. Look at the top row of the chart and find the first person’s relationship to the common ancestor.
  3. Look at the far left column of the chart and find the second person’s relationship to the common ancestor.
  4. Move across the columns and down the rows to determine where the row and column containing these two relationships (from #2 & #3) meet. This box is the relationship between the two individuals.

NOW YOU CAN SAY HI TO COUSIN FRED, TWICE REMOVED!

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About bakoheat

Writer/Musician
This entry was posted in Uncategorized and tagged , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

3 Responses to Kissing Cousins, Twice Removed

  1. Mary says:

    I learned this when I was a social worker as whether they could be placed in a home as a relative or we had to license them depended on the relationship. Add in “by marriage” and you can have even more fun.

  2. fiddlrts says:

    This gets to be really fun when someone dies without a will. (Intestate) We get to play bingo with your chart, often ending up with property divided into tiny slivers at multiple generations…

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